News from the Library–Jan 9, 2015

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Non-Fiction Text Features Scavenger Hunt

This week, to ease back into the routine after Winter Break, sixth graders did a Non-Fiction Text Features Scavenger Hunt.  After choosing a non-fiction book–or two or three–they had to find each of eight text features and cite where they found them.  This was a good review and quick assessment and they even enjoyed it!

Also in the Library this week…

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Kindergarten–Brr….it was cold outside.  (OK, by California standards….)  Kindergarteners loved hearing Tacky the Penguin by Helen Lester.  This book has become a classic not only for its humor but for the lovely message that it’s ok to be odd sometimes and everyone has value.

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First Grade–What is you had a magic horse that could help you solve the problem of your parent’s stack of bills?  Well, Rosie has.  By making her popsicle stick collection come alive, and turn into a magic horse, she secures a pirates’ treasure to help her parents pay those bills!  Ridiculous?  Yes.  Charming? Undoubtedly.  Rosie’s Magic Horse by Russell Hoban is just one of those delightful books that simply celebrates the imagination.  A big hit with the first graders.

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Second Grade– What fun it is to learn big words.  Second graders figured out what obstinate means after hearing Frank W. Dormer’s hilarious The Obstinate Pen.  We first did the visible thinking routine called See, Think, Wonder to get some idea of the quirky tale of the pen that had a mind of its own.  This is one of those laugh out loud books that kids love to hear, plus they came away with a new way to describe….well….some of their own behavior at times!

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Third Grade–Goatlilocks by Erica Perl is the perfect way to use the visible thinking routine called Same, Same, Different and to teach about plot.  First we watched a very funny book trailer for the book on YouTube and then students reviewed the plot of Goldilocks and the Three Bears.  When reading the story, we stopped and made comparisons of the two plots.

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Fourth Grade–One of my favorite read-alouds is Mrs. Marlowe’s Mice by Frank Asch and marvelously illustrated by Devin Asch.  This tale has so many twists and turns that it makes the perfect stage for the visible thinking routine called I Used to Think, but Now I Think.  It had students on the edge of their chairs.  The illustrations are very eerie and perfectly match the story.  The overriding message of the story is a great discussion point as well.

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Fifth Grade–The Yellow Star: The Legend of Kind Christian X of Denmark by Carmen Agra Deedy is a great book for fifth graders.  We discussed what a legend is and how it is the same and different from a folktale or other traditional literature forms.  This book is a classic example of a legend.  The story is gripping and students had a lively discussion afterwards about what they would do in a similar situation

Sixth Grade–See opening post.

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