News From the Library–May 23, 2011

Fun with the States

Fifth Graders are busy at work on their research projects about the states and to give them a little break from all that research, I read Laurie Heller’s delightfully funny book, The Scrambled States of America.  When all the states get a little bored with their location, they decide to have a party and then to switch locations.  It’s great to see students getting all the funny little jokes and feeling an attachment to “their state.”  The illustrations are whimsical and the size and presentation of the book make it a sure fire hit as a read aloud.  Once again, I was reminded of how, in this age of ebooks and videos, children still love the experience of being read to, especially a book of such high quality and attention grabbing content.

Also in the Library this week……

Kindergarten–Another attention grabbing book with a great little message is Lauren Child’s I Will Never Not Ever Eat a Tomato.  Kindergarteners loved the progression from not eating anything to eating all those healthy foods with the delight full names like moonsquirters and clouds.  (Wish this had been around for my picky eaters….).

First Grade–Stanley is a dog who finds lots of fun things to do when his people are out at night and what starts with lounging on the couch progresses to a full fledged party any teenager would be proud of.  With the inevitable result of getting caught, Stanley finds himself on clean up duty and with a legend that even dogs today still talk about.  Stanley’s Party by Linda Bailey is  part of a series of books with this hilarious dog as the main character. The illlustrations by Bill Slavin make these books irresistible!

Second Grade–In Margie Palatini’s book The Perfect Pet, the narrator tries plan after plan to get her parents to let her have a pet.  In the end she finds the perfect one–a bug named Doug–who doesn’t eat to much, scratch the furniture, bark loudly, or take up too much room.  This is a great book to illustrate persuasive writing techniques, or better yet, to learn persuasive getting-the-pet-you-want techniques!

Third Grade–The best part of William Steig’s The Amazing Bone is the spell the bone casts on the fox with a stream of nonsense words that frankly is really fun to read aloud.  It always elicits a stream of giggles. All of Mr. Steig’s books are wonderful examples of the love of language and I love reading them to students and having them figure out words like dawdling, and odiferous, and flabbergasted.  To me it seems to show that Mr. Steig respected children’s abilities and  a belief that children should be exposed to the beauty of descriptive words.  His books are also a great way to teach the value of context clues.  Several students wanted to copy down some of the bone’s better insults to use on their older siblings.  Their favorite?  “You odiferous wretch!”

Fourth Grade–This week fourth graders worked on website evaluation using an ABC approach.  A meant looking for the author or sponsor of the website, B meant looking for bias or opinions as opposed to just facts, and C stood for credibility and currency.  We looked at two websites together and compared them and then they had a chance to evaluate one on their own using the ABCs.  Evaluation of information is now a crucial part of learning research techniques.

Fifth Grade–see opening post

Sixth Grade–Sixth graders played their final game of Library Jeopardy in preparation for their upcoming “Library Final Exam.”

And just a reminder….

The time has come to start “rounding up” all those library books.  Don’t forget to look under the bed, in the closet, or one of my personal experiences with my son…in the refrigerator!

Advertisements

One comment on “News From the Library–May 23, 2011

  1. Love seeing that second graders are reading THE PERFECT PET!
    (btw: I think Olive would love watching the very fun book reviews of two literary rats in their animated blog — RAT CHAT.)
    Check them all out — http://www.ratchatreviews.com
    Newest episode is on Carolyn Crimi’s new book, DEAR TABBY (an advice-giving cat.)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s